3 proven ways to improve higher-ed collaboration

Collaboration across departments has been identified as the fundamental differentiator in achieving strategic objectives in not only the business community but also in higher education. Today’s challenging higher-ed environment can benefit from more collaboration, particularly between IT, business, and finance leaders.

The EDUCAUSE/NACUBO 2017 Enterprise IT Summit identified four main areas that can markedly enhance collaboration:

  • development of institutional relationships and partnerships
  • improvement of analytics and data governance initiatives
  • a forward -thinking leadership team to align unit goals with university goals
  • cultivation of a better understanding of IT costs and strategic value

eCampus News highlighted one example that showcased the fruits of collaboration at Emory & Henry College in Emory, Virginia, where IT, finance, and housing collaborated to transform the campus into one of the most digitally connected campuses of its size. Business Officer magazine wrote about a private university where close collaboration between the vice president for advancement and chief business officer during a capital campaign allowed the vice president to tie his asks to strategic initiatives. By working together, they devised a feasible multi-year capital and operating budget that furthers the work of both divisions.…Read More

3 ways to transform your campus to support BYOD collaboration

Learning in the digital age has become more mobile, social, and technologically rich. Many professors are spending less time lecturing and more time assigning collaborative group projects that rely on IT tools as connection points for students. This shift has big implications for classroom design. Higher education institutions are creating active learning classrooms with movable furniture and adaptable workspaces. Interactive touchscreens, large displays, and digital tools that allow interoperability between various devices are becoming common sights in university classrooms, lecture halls, and libraries.

Immersed in daily use of technology, today’s typical student brings a smartphone, tablet, or laptop into the classroom—along with high expectations that they’ll have access to tools that will help them learn, share, and communicate their work in real time.

To keep pace with this emerging landscape, higher education technology leaders should consider the best cost-effective ways to embrace bring your own device (BYOD) collaboration on their campuses.…Read More