Top higher-education technology news: February 2013

The February issue of eCampus News focuses on Campus IT Suppot and Learning Analytics.

The nation’s largest MOOC platform says it will offer certification to students who complete its courses … Colleges turn to learning analytics programs to boost student retention … Campus CIOs have a new roadmap for success: These are among the top higher-education technology stories in the February 2013 edition of eCampus News.

Our February digital edition is now available online. You can browse the full publication here, or click on any of the headlines below to read these highlights:

Learning analytics aim to boost student retention, outcomes…Read More

Best practices in higher-education technology use: January 2013

Here are some of the best practices in higher-education technology use featured in the January 2013 edition of eCampus News.

A new eLearning network gives students more choices … MOOCs help with remedial college math … Sharing IT services pays off for Oklahoma universities: These are among the best practices in higher-education technology use featured in the January 2013 edition of eCampus News.

Our January issue is now available online. You can browse the full publication here, or click on any of the headlines below to read these highlights:

New eLearning network gives students more choices…Read More

Top higher-education technology news: January 2013

Here are some of the top higher-education technology stories featured in the January 2013 edition of eCampus News.

MOOCs take higher education by storm … Software virtualization takes root on campus … Web scammers target job-seeking college students: These are among the top higher-education technology stories featured in the January 2013 edition of eCampus News.

Our January issue is now available online. You can browse the full publication here, or click on any of the headlines below to read these highlights:

MOOCs take higher ed by storm…Read More

Survey highlights how technology is used in higher education

Although many individuals think college students only use technology for personal communication, various studies have shown that electronics can be useful in academia as well, U.S. News reports. For example, an October study by the Lone Star College System shows that approximately 78% of degree seekers feel that when technology is used properly on college campuses, they can improve their grades and become more engaged in their learning experience, The Chronicle of Higher Education reports. To paint a clearer picture of how technology is being used in higher education, the nonprofit Educause recently released the results of its 2011 National Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology…

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…Read More

Music instruction goes virtual

Virtual music instruction could have big implications for higher ed.
Virtual music instruction could have big implications for higher education.

As online courses spike in popularity across the nation, students are finding that even the most traditional face-to-face courses offer virtual options that are just as thorough as in-person classes—and music instruction courses soon could follow suit.

This past spring, Louisiana State University (LSU) and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) partnered for a remote piano teaching demonstration using technologically enhanced pianos from Yamaha.

During the demonstration, LSU connected a Yamaha Disklavier IV piano over the internet with another Disklavier at UCLA. The demonstration featured a mini-master class with LSU School of Music professor Michael Gurt teaching a UCLA piano student, UCLA visiting associate piano professor Jennifer Snow interacting with an LSU piano student, and LSU graduate students in piano pedagogy teaching a UCLA undergraduate student.…Read More

EDUCAUSE 2010 follows top trends in campus IT

EDUCAUSE will bring leading campus technology leaders together.
EDUCAUSE will bring leading campus technology leaders together.

EDUCAUSE 2010 kicks off on Oct. 12 in Anahein, Calif., and will give higher education IT leaders a chance to learn from successful practices and share their own thoughts and ideas on what makes for truly successful technology management on campus.

A panel session on open-source strategies will encourage respectful dialogue across divergent perspectives and experiences in discussing the promise and risks of open source and the strategies employed by technology leaders with diverse approaches.Speakers include John E. Kolb, vice president for information services and technology and CIO at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and John F. Walsh, associate vice president of enterprise software at Indiana University.

Mobile computing is increasingly common and has great potential for higher education. Students are arriving on campus with new wireless devices and recent fourth-generation wireless products, and devices continue to expand features and functionality. Which applications should become mobile-ready? Are there plans in place to rapidly deploy mobile-ready applications? What challenges do mobile devices create for protecting sensitive institutional information? Terry R. Mollett, director of user services at Dickinson College, will examine all the issues.…Read More

New electronic devices could interest schools

The Skiff eReader is among new technologies with implications for education.
The Skiff eReader is among new technologies with implications for education.

New netbooks, tablet computers, and eBook reader devices, as well as fresh developments in television and even a wireless tether to keep cell phones from getting lost, are among the technologies being unveiled this week at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas–technologies that might hold interest for schools and colleges as well.

Small and inexpensive netbooks have been among the most popular computers during the recession, wooing schools and consumers alike with their portability and prices that were often below $400. Now, with the economy improving, computer buyers will be asked to open their wallets to new styles of computers, including some costing a bit more.

Among the new offerings introduced at CES: lightweight, medium-sized laptops meant as a step above netbooks in price and performance, as well as a new category of device called the “smartbook,” a tiny computer that combines elements of netbooks and so-called smart phones.…Read More

New electronic devices could interest schools

The Skiff eReader is among new technologies with implications for education.
The Skiff eReader is among new technologies with implications for education.

New netbooks, tablet computers, and eBook reader devices, as well as fresh developments in television and even a wireless tether to keep cell phones from getting lost, are among the technologies being unveiled this week at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas–technologies that might hold interest for schools and colleges as well.

Small and inexpensive netbooks have been among the most popular computers during the recession, wooing schools and consumers alike with their portability and prices that were often below $400. Now, with the economy improving, computer buyers will be asked to open their wallets to new styles of computers, including some costing a bit more.

Among the new offerings introduced at CES: lightweight, medium-sized laptops meant as a step above netbooks in price and performance, as well as a new category of device called the “smartbook,” a tiny computer that combines elements of netbooks and so-called smart phones.…Read More