Here’s how to reach your most social, tech-savvy students

Higher-ed institutions using YouTube, Snapchat to announce student’s acceptance

student-social-snapchat
Copyright: Gil C/Shutterstock

In a trend that’s quickly catching on in many colleges and universities across the country, institutions are turning to trendy social media platforms to engage prospective students. The reason? The need to connect with a generation accustomed to smartphones and images.

One example is with a new University of Southern California Academy. Rather than traditional brochures or letters in the mail, students admitted to the new USC Academy received their acceptance announcements through innovative YouTube videos.

The USC Jimmy Iovine and Andre Young Academy for Arts, Technology and the Business of Innovation sent personalized video messages to accepted students filmed by the donors, Jimmy Iovine and Andre “Dr. Dre” Young.…Read More

New online tool reveals a university’s ‘real’ price to students

Tuition Tracker shows prospective students an institution’s ‘net price’

money200How much does college cost? Somewhere between “a heck of a lot” and “not as much as you might think.”

Sure, college is expensive, but a new online tool unveiled last week, Tuition Tracker, is trying to take some of the mystery out of college pricing.

“I’ve often wondered why (colleges) have a sticker price and why colleges don’t simply charge a net price and stop acting like an airline or a used car salesman,” said Jon Marcus, higher education editor at The Hechinger Report and one of the Tuition Tracker’s producers.…Read More

Is this the Netflix for student college searches?

New partnership will research how Netflix-like Discovery Engine can improve college search, recommendation and fit

netflix-college-search
Copyright: Twin Design / Shutterstock.com

Two organizations have joined forces to answer important questions related to how search, discovery and recommendation online are affecting student college choices. Specifically, both organizations will research the effects of Netflix-like recommendations made possible by new online search technology.

PossibilityU, a college guidance platform, and GroupLens, a research lab dedicated to recommender systems and online communities in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities announced a research partnership to explore how college recommendations online can effect a broad range of student outcomes.

For the past 3 years, PossibilityU’s unique college guidance program has been matching high school students across the country with colleges that match their talents, aspirations and family budgets. The program features guided inquiry, data visualizations and personalized, Netflix-like recommendations—all designed to give students confidence in their choices.…Read More

Entertainment devices draining campus wi-fi

Entertainment devices like Nintendo 3DS systems increased by 1,000 percent in one year on college campuses, new study says

entertainment-colleges-wifi
Copyright: Barone Firenze

Wi-fi-connected devices on college campuses have more than tripled since last year, with entertainment devices far outpacing the increases in tablets and smartphones, a new report said.

Smart TVs and Nintendo 3DS systems increased more than 1,000 percent between 2012 and 2013, a study conducted by residential network provider Apogee found. The study is based on a comparison of network demand data on Apogee’s client campuses.

Entertainment devices are proving to be a massive drain on campus networks as colleges and universities race to meet constantly growing bandwidth demands.…Read More

3 new tools for your 2014 campus arsenal

Tools include new guide for faculty publishing, new way to measure completion

tools-college-educationAn influx of new technologies and resources for higher education have either just landed or are about to land, making this spring/summer 2014 one of the busiest seasons for innovation—and eCampus News (eCN) is highlighting three tools with the most potential.

From the next social networking app that could be an incentive for incoming students to an innovative data tracking tool supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, these three noteworthy technologies could help your institution improve in efficiency and be on the forefront of higher-ed innovation.

This resource tool roundup is part of eCN’s ongoing mission to provide readers with the most current news and information available in higher-ed. Know of any tools or resources coming to market or recently available for postsecondary learning? Are these tools you’d recommend to other institutions, faculty or admin? Please leave your suggestions in the comment section on this page, or email me at mstansbury@ecampusnews.com.…Read More

5 new ways students are choosing their colleges and universities

Survey reveals social choosing habits of graduating high school students; gives advice to colleges and universities

students-choose-collegeGone are the days when students chose their postsecondary education institution based off of U.S. News & World Report publications. In this mobile-enabled culture, today’s students are redefining how colleges and universities should market their offerings by using diverse online resources and social media word-of-mouth.

The 2014 Social Admissions Report, a survey of college-bound high school students, is designed to identify trends in digital, social and mobile tools represented in a student’s college search and enrollment process.

“Year after year new tools are created to help us organize, share and collaborate online,” said Uversity—a platform for social networking and higher education. “Inevitably when these tools hit the mainstream the debate begins as to the impact of these networks on the college search and recruitment process. Through thousands of student surveys and national focus groups, the Zinch, Chegg and Uversity teams have collaborated to complete the third installment of The Social Admissions Report.”…Read More

How colleges are propelling women into computer science-and why

Good intentions and promising programs are not enough; how colleges are stepping up to the women in computer science challenge

computer-science-women If there is any hope of reversing the stunning decline of women’s participation in computer science, it is going to take an effort of moonshot magnitude radiating from Washington, D.C.

The handful of promising and well-meaning programs at Stanford University, the University of California-Berkeley and elsewhere are a good start, but really only one small step for womankind. We need a window-rattling, world-beating blastoff that represents a giant leap—and which ensures that every girl in America takes a high-quality computer science course before she graduates from high school.

We need a nation that looks at the fact that only 17.6 percent of computer science degrees go to women and meets that challenge as if half the country weren’t being taught to read or to write a meaningful sentence.…Read More

Helicopter parents find their helipad

A new online portal at University of Tennessee at Martin allows helicopter parents to check their students’ grades, attendance and more.

helicopter-parents-college

To many in higher education, “helicopter parents” can be an annoyance, constantly asking institutions for updates on their adult children’s finances, grades and attendance.

Some university researchers have even asked parents to cut it out, warning them that helicopter parenting can cause anxiety, depression and even ruin a student’s chance at getting a job.…Read More

College-educated workers are taking jobs that don’t require degrees

In a packed pub in midtown Manhattan, Ryan Flagherty is surrounded on three sides by people clamoring for his attention, the Los Angeles Times reports. He spins one way and pours a shot of vodka into a glass, then turns around and wedges a lime into a bottle of Corona, pushing it across the counter. Ignoring the annoyed gaze of a bulky man on his right, he turns again to a touch-screen register to ring up the sales. It’s just a minute out of the grueling, physically demanding eight-hour shift that will last long into the night. But Flagherty, 28, isn’t complaining. With the generous tips of New Yorkers and his pick of shifts, he pulls in around $80,000 a year as a bartender. It’s more than he was offered for various office jobs he considered when he arrived in the city, even though he’s highly educated. “I have a master’s in economics and I’m bartending in New York,” he said with a shrug. “It’s a good way to make money.”

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Researcher: College CIO shortage on the horizon

Forty-five percent of college CIOs plan to retire by 2020, according to a recent study.
Forty-five percent of college CIOs plan to retire by 2020, according to a recent study.

Wayne Brown’s seven years of research has identified a wide swath of campus technology officials eager to become chief information officers someday. They’re just not quite sure how.

Excelsior College, an online school based in Albany, N.Y., unveiled this month the Center for Technology Leadership (CTL), which will open next October in Silver Spring, Md., and host week-long courses designed to plug the “readiness gap” for computer experts who strive to head their college’s technology office, but need extensive training on how to translate techno-speak for campus higher-ups and allocate responsibilities to staff members.

The lack of guidance for aspiring CIOs, coupled with projections that show nearly half of higher-education technology chiefs plan to retire in the next decade, translates to a potential CIO shortfall for college campuses of every size, said Brown, head of the Center for Higher Education Chief Information Officer Studies and Excelsior’s vice president of technology.…Read More