The top places to study video game design–for credit

Are you a high school student who dreams of inventing the next Wii or Kinect sensation, or the next “Call of Duty”? For the second year in a row, Princeton Review and GamePro Media, the publisher of GamePro magazine, a video-gamers’ bible, have joined forces to handicap what they consider the “Top 10” undergraduate and graduate programs in video game design, reports the Choice…

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How much do college students learn, and study?

While The Choice tends to focus on the process of applying to college, we also consider it within our mission to ask how much learning and studying students generally do once they enroll. A new book, “Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses” (University of Chicago Press) by a professor at New York University and another at the University of Virginia, attempts to answer questions like these in a systematic way–and, as its title suggests, its findings suggest reason for concern. In the book, and in an accompanying study being released Tuesday, the authors followed more than 2,300 undergraduates at two dozen universities, and concluded that 45 percent “demonstrated no significant gains in critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and written communications during the first two years of college.”

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Your college major may not be as important as you think

Many students encounter tremendous pressure from their parents to adopt “practical” majors, and I’ve talked to a handful of students whose parents flatly refused to provide for their educational expenses unless they majored in something career-oriented. With less than half of recent college graduates landing jobs that require a college degree, this concern is understandable, says Zac Bissonnette of The Choice for the New York Times. But it’s misguided. In recent years, research into the importance of choice of major has led to a surprising conclusion: it’s really not all that important. A study conducted by PayScale Inc. found that history majors who pursued careers in business ended up earning, on average, just as much as business majors. Ramit Sethi, a blogger and the author of “I Will Teach You to Be Rich” is also a fan of “impractical majors.” He studied in the Sciences, Technology, and Society Program at Stanford…

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