University’s social media crackdown draws major online backlash

A host of negative tweets targeted WKU Feb. 27.

A Kentucky university is aggressively fighting parody and criticism of school officials on Twitter and other social media sites, which students and free-speech advocates say is a constitutionally questionable attempt to silence any negative comments.

Western Kentucky University’s president has used Facebook to lecture students about social networking etiquette, and officials persuaded Twitter to briefly shut down a parody account dripping with sarcasm and criticism with posts marked “#wku.”

Officials deny charges of censorship, but observers say the school appears to have immersed itself in the policing of social media deeper than many others around the country.…Read More

University ditches controversial social media rules

SHSU’s social media rules drew campus-wide protests.

Sam Houston State University’s social media policy that drew heated criticism from a national free-speech organization and student groups has been nixed by campus officials.

Administrators on the 17,000-student public campus in Huntsville, Texas, said they would scrap the Social Media Policy and Procedure Manual that was protested by disparate campus political groups, opting instead to create a new set of rules from scratch.

The school’s policy stipulated that any student group that uses the university’s name or abbreviation must join the official SHSU social media universe or change their name. A student group would have to change its name to something that was not trademarked by SHSU or face legal repercussions.…Read More

How many people does it take to run a college’s Facebook page?

Most colleges have social media teams of two or three people.

Most college campuses don’t have one staff member toiling away on the social web, answering students’ burning questions and updating the school’s Facebook page. Some institutions have an entire team – seven people, sometimes more, managing the daily Facebook goings-on.

It depends on the size of a university and its commitment to consistent communication with prospective and current students and web-savvy alums, but social media staff varies widely from campus to campus, according to research released Nov. 16 by Varsity Outreach, a company that advises schools with web-based promotion.

Three in 10 colleges have one employee to manage the school’s Facebook presence, according to the Varsity Outreach study, while a few schools – 4 percent of respondents – have seven or more staff members managing and updating social media sites.…Read More

The masters of social media in higher education

StudentAdvisor evaluated social media initiatives at 6,000 colleges.

From tweeting the day’s dining hall menu to online posts showing where students can find an empty parking spot, campus officials have found inventive ways to use social media for practical purposes.

The 100 best uses of social media in higher education were released this fall by StudentAdvisor.com, a Massachusetts-based website that helps prospective students compare schools.

The annual ranking reads like a laundry list of the most effective ways campus decision makers can draw students with relevant information that can become an everyday part of their Twitter and Facebook feeds.…Read More

Controversial social media rules spark student backlash

SHSU student groups might have to change their names in accordance with new school policy.

Sam Houston State University’s controversial social media policy is perhaps the only thing that could unite the campus’s College Republicans, College Democrats, and the Young Democratic Socialists: The groups have joined together to protest rules that could affect their presence of Twitter and Facebook.

SHSU, a 17,000-student public campus in Huntsville, Texas, rolled out a new policy for university-related social media this semester, creating a “social media universe” that student groups can join on popular social sites where students communicate and announcements are made and discussed.

The school’s policy stipulates that any student group that uses the university’s name or abbreviation must join the official SHSU social media universe or change their name.…Read More

Gov. releases performance funding model for higher education

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced his newest education plan Aug. 25, proposing a performance-funding model for higher education. The model will fund higher education, but only if colleges and universities meet the goals they each set for themselves, the Maneater reports. Nixon said this is his next step for higher education, following up last year’s “Training for Tomorrow” and “Caring for Missourians” programs, which created certification programs in high-demand fields for Missouri college students.

“Moving forward, we must now fix the funding model for higher education, to make it less crisis-driven and more predictable from year-to-year,” Nixon stated in a news release…

Click here for the full story…Read More

Gov. releases performance funding model for higher education

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced his newest education plan Aug. 25, proposing a performance-funding model for higher education. The model will fund higher education, but only if colleges and universities meet the goals they each set for themselves, the Maneater reports. Nixon said this is his next step for higher education, following up last year’s “Training for Tomorrow” and “Caring for Missourians” programs, which created certification programs in high-demand fields for Missouri college students.

“Moving forward, we must now fix the funding model for higher education, to make it less crisis-driven and more predictable from year-to-year,” Nixon stated in a news release…

Click here for the full story…Read More

Gov. releases performance funding model for higher education

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced his newest education plan Aug. 25, proposing a performance-funding model for higher education. The model will fund higher education, but only if colleges and universities meet the goals they each set for themselves, the Maneater reports. Nixon said this is his next step for higher education, following up last year’s “Training for Tomorrow” and “Caring for Missourians” programs, which created certification programs in high-demand fields for Missouri college students.

“Moving forward, we must now fix the funding model for higher education, to make it less crisis-driven and more predictable from year-to-year,” Nixon stated in a news release…

Click here for the full story…Read More