Publishers question Apple’s rejection of nudity

About a year ago Sebastian Kempa, a freelance photographer who lives near Dortmund, Germany, embarked on a project to show how clothes “are our second layer of skin,” reports The New York Times. “They disguise, reveal, mirror our innermost being or help to hide it,” Mr. Kempa says on his Web site. Mr. Kempa has photographed dozens of people with and without their clothing, and is showing the “before” and “after” results on the site, www.naked-people.de. The site is not pornographic, at least not by the standards of Germany, where it is considered prudish to wear a towel to a unisex sauna. The models are all ordinary people; the pictures are anything but arousing. So Mr. Kempa was surprised that when he tried to create an iPhone application for the online exhibition, it was rejected by Apple.

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Social media use on the rise, but fewer young people are blogging

The use of mobile devices has led to shorter forms of communication among youth.
The use of mobile devices has led to shorter forms of communication among youth.

The use of social-networking web sites among young Americans continues to climb, with nearly three-fourths of American teens now using these sites. But fewer teens and young adults are blogging now than four years ago, and the number of those who use Twitter is still very low.

These are among the findings of a new study from the Pew Internet & American Life Project, called “Social Media & Mobile Internet Use Among Teens and Young Adults.” Released Feb. 3, the study reveals new trends with implications for schools.

The study found that young people are losing interest in long-form blogging, as their communication habits have become increasingly brief and mobile. Technology experts say it doesn’t mean blogging is going away. Instead, they say, it has gone the way of the telephone and eMail—still useful, just not trendy.…Read More

Students use iPods, iPhones to grade Obama’s address

Abilene Christian students answered about 50 questions on their iPhones and iPods during President Obama's address.
Abilene Christian students answered 50 questions on their iPhones and iPods during Obama's address.

It’s the stuff that makes political pollsters salivate: 30 Abilene Christian University students used iPhones and iPod Touches to respond to President Obama’s Jan. 27 State of the Union address in real time, and a campus technology official said the exercise offered insight into boosting student participation in class.

Abilene Christian was among the country’s first campuses to bring iPhones to students when the school gave the devices to incoming freshmen last school year. Freshmen and sophomores now have university-issued iPhones or iPod Touches, and professors from the political science and journalism programs assembled 30 students to gauge reaction during Obama’s first State of the Union speech.

“It was a helpful exercise because … we were able to see if an interactive environment helped students engage in politics differently,” said Dennis Marquardt, Abilene Christian’s educational technology manager, who helped oversee the project. “It helped us understand where students were coming from a little bit more.”…Read More

Educators intrigued by Apple’s iPad

The Apple iPad will start at $499.
The web-enabled Apple iPad starts at $499.

Apple’s new tablet computer, the iPad, could push other companies to bring more color-capable eReaders to the market in a move that could make digital books more commonplace on school campuses, educators said after the long-awaited release of the technology giant’s latest product.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the iPad Jan. 27, calling it a new third category of mobile device that is neither smart phone nor laptop, but something in between.

The iPad, which is Wi-Fi enabled, has 10 hours of battery life, features a 9.7-inch screen, weighs 1.5 lbs, and will use the iPhone operating system, meaning education companies that have made iPhone apps can make their technology available for iPad users.…Read More

Can Apple’s tablet spark a textbook revolution?

Educators expect the Apple tablet screen to be much larger than the iPhone display.
Educators expect the Apple tablet screen to be much larger than the iPhone display.

Can the release of Apple’s eReader tablet do for textbooks what the iPod did for music: combine an online store for purchasing books with sleek hardware that holds every text a student needs?

That’s the question many educators are asking as anticipation of Apple’s new tablet mounts.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs is widely expected to unveil his company’s eReader Jan. 27 in San Francisco, and industry insiders expect the product to have a large touch screen that is smaller than a laptop screen but larger than an iPhone.…Read More

The fine print behind Google’s Nexus One

I really like the Nexus One, Google’s first phone, New York Times technology columnist David Pogue writes. It’s got some glitches, as I noted in my review, but in general, it’s a fast, sleek, powerful app phone. And it’s cool that Google is trying to bring its shake-things-up approach to the corrupt, calcified cellphone industry. But Google, my friends, has never been anything but a software company. And from the looks of things, Google was not at all prepared for its moment to become a hardware company overnight. Or has Google learned too fast how to make money selling hardware? It seems it has figured out how to collect an early-termination fee in addition to the one you’ll pay the carrier…

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