Weathering education cuts

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett proposed cuts last month that would slash the state’s higher-education budget to $567 million from $1.2 billion, affecting more than a dozen state-run and state-supported universities, reports the Wall Street Journal. For the University of Pittsburgh’s Katz Graduate School of Business and College of Business Administration, tuition would have to be increased by 40% to break even, although the school doesn’t plan to implement such a dramatic increase. John Delaney, who has been the school’s dean since August 2006, spoke with the Wall Street Journal about the budget cuts and how far the school is prepared to go to keep itself afloat. “I think we’ll have to really change the way we do things,” Mr. Delaney says…

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Google ‘to reorganize YouTube channels’

U.S. internet giant Google is preparing a major overhaul of video sharing website YouTube by creating “channels” to compete with broadcast and cable TV, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday. Under a plan costing as much as $100 million, the YouTube homepage will highlight different channels focused on topics like arts and sports, the Journal said, citing people familiar with the matter…

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Career Education re-evaluating long-term milestones

For-profit educator Career Education Corp. (CECO) said it may have to lower its growth targets for coming years because of the toll that proposed new regulations could take on enrollment growth, reports the Wall Street Journal. However, the Hoffman Estates, Ill., company said it isn’t yet ready to provide details of its new targets. The company’s re-evaluation, announced Wednesday on a conference call with analysts, comes as other college companies have trimmed or withdrawn their own guidance in recent weeks, with most citing regulatory uncertainty and slowing enrollment growth…

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Education gains shield women from worst of job woes

Steady increases among women with college degrees over the past two decades apparently have paid off during the recession, with government statistics showing they fared better than men over the past year, and for the first time surpassed the number of men holding payroll jobs, reports the Wall Street Journal. Women were earning about 166 associates degrees and 135 bachelor’s degrees for every 100 earned by men in 2007, according to the U.S. Department of Education. More women were employed in teaching, government and health care, sectors that held up better in the recession. The construction and manufacturing sectors, which often require less schooling, have shed millions of jobs in the last few years. Revised data released last week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed women held about 720,000 more nonfarm payroll jobs than men in January. They also exceeded the number of men on the payroll during four months last year.

“This is unprecedented,” said Tim Consedine, regional economist,at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in Boston.

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Textbook firms ink e-deals for iPad

Major textbook publishers have struck deals with software company ScrollMotion Inc. to adapt their textbooks for the electronic page, as the industry embraces a hope that digital devices such as Apple‘s iPad will transform the classroom, reports the Wall Street Journal. The publishers are tapping the know-how of ScrollMotion to develop textbook applications and test-prep and study guides for the iPad. “People have been talking about the impact of technology on education for 25 years. It feels like it is really going to happen in 2010,” said Rik Kranenburg, group president of higher education for the education unit of McGraw-Hill Cos. and one of the publishers involved in the project. Other publishers include Houghton Mifflin Harcourt K-12, Pearson PLC’s Pearson Education, and Washington Post Co.’s Kaplan Inc., known for its test-prep and study guides. Many developers and publishers are working on applications that will work on the iPad and other digital devices. Maureen McMahon, president of Kaplan Publishing, said a recent Kaplan study showed that students remain big fans of printed books but that they would be more receptive to e-textbooks on portable digital devices. Whether the iPad will be the digital device to transform the classroom remains to be seen. “Nobody knows what device will take off, or which ‘killer app’ will drive student adaptations. Today they aren’t reading e-textbooks on their laptops. But ahead we see all kinds of new instruction materials,” said Kranenburg…

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