In student affairs, social media remains a common tool

Seventy-one percent of student affairs professionals use Facebook at work, according to a survey conducted by NASPA Tech KC.

The number of teenagers using Facebook has sharply declined, according to a report released by the Pew Research Center in May. The annual E-Expectations Report also recently found that college-bound high school juniors and seniors are using Facebook less, as well as Google Plus and YouTube.

But while student use of many social networking services may be down, those who work in student affairs say they are still frequently using the sites – both on and off the job.

Seventy-one percent of student affairs employees use Facebook professionally, according to a survey conducted by NASPA Tech KC. Nearly half of the survey’s respondents said they use the video site YouTube, and about two-thirds said they use the micro-blogging service Twitter. (Twitter use is also up among college-bound high schoolers.)…Read More

Are college-bound students leaving social media?

Sixty-seven percent of students say they still use Facebook, but that’s a drop of 12 percentage points from last year.

A new survey has found sharp decreases in the number of college-bound high school juniors and seniors who use social media sites like Facebook, YouTube, and Google Plus.

The 2013 E-Expectations Report, conducted by Noel-Levitz, OmniUpdate, CollegeWeekLive, and NRCCUA during March and April, examined how social media and mobile devices are affecting students’ search for the right college. About 2,000 students participated in the survey.

Sixty-seven percent of the respondents said they still use Facebook, but that’s a drop of 12 percentage points from last year. In a webinar announcing the findings, Stephanie Geyer, Noel-Levitz’s associate vice president, cautioned admissions offices from reacting too rashly based on the results.…Read More

Textbooks are coming to students’ Facebook news feeds

Seven in 10 students say they would be likely to use a Facebok app that might improve their grades.

In between commenting on photos, posting videos, and updating statuses, college students will be able to read textbooks, study with classmates, and post questions on Facebook after a California-based digital textbook company released its eBooks to the world’s most popular social network.

Kno, an educational software company that grabbed the attention of campus technologists in July with the release of a controversial eBook survey, announced Aug. 10 that it would make more than 100,000 digital textbooks readable via Facebook.

Read more about Facebook in higher education……Read More