Skills-based hiring offers opportunities to workers who have learned skills in programs like apprenticeships and other training programs rather than relying solely on degree requirements.

Employers eye skills-based hiring


Skills-based hiring offers opportunities to workers who have learned skills in programs like apprenticeships and other training programs rather than relying solely on degree requirements

Key points:

Driven by the need to fill skill gaps in a rapidly changing job market, new data highlights a global shift towards skills-based hiring and away from traditional graduate screening proxies.

The State of Global Early Career Hiring 2024, from HireVue, reveals key insights into the evolving landscape of early career recruitment across the globe. The report was produced in partnership with The Institute of Student EmployersThe National Association of Colleges and Employers, and The Australian Association of Graduate Employers.

In the U.S. less than 40 percent of employers reported that they are screening candidates by GPA this year.

In the UK, 54 percent of employers expect to move to a recruitment approach that focuses on evaluating candidates based on their skills, rather than education or past work experience alone. 

In Australia, only 30 percent of employers said they felt examination results were ‘very important’ or ‘quite important’ to assess during the selection process, down from 38 percent in 2022.

“Employers need to hire based on the potential of candidates to adapt in a rapidly changing environment. IO psychologists have always recommended hiring based on a combination of skills, motivations, and individual characteristics, and it’s great to see wider acceptance of the methodology. This holistic approach is helping organizations unlock the true potential of early career talent,” said Dr. Nathan Mondragon, Chief IO Psychologist at HireVue.

As recruitment teams face increased pressure with rising application numbers and ongoing budget constraints, the report underscores the importance of leveraging new technologies to improve efficiency while maintaining a personalized candidate experience. The adoption of AI in recruitment continues gathering pace, with notable increases in its use for psychometric assessments:

  • In the U.S., more than 40 percent of career services professionals reported using AI for work tasks over the last year.
  • The UK saw AI usage jump from 9 percent to 28 percent in 2023.
  • Australian professionals reported significantly lower adoption of the technology with just 16 percent of organizations currently using AI as part of their recruitment process.

Skills-based hiring is receiving recognition at the federal level, as well. In late April, the White House Office of the National Cyber Director hosted a first-of-its-kind convening at the White House where representatives from more than 30 companies and institutions representing a dozen industries committed to expand opportunities for Americans and build a strong cyber workforce.

The event focused on creating pathways for more Americans to enter the growing field of cybersecurity through practices like skills-based hiring and earn-and-learn opportunities such as apprenticeships. More than 500,000 cybersecurity positions are currently open across the country.

Skills-based hiring opens up opportunities to workers who have learned skills in programs like apprenticeships and other training programs rather than relying solely on two or four-year college degree requirements. The Biden-Harris Administration has prioritized expanding registered apprenticeships and has invested $440 million in related programs. In March 2024, President Biden signed an Executive Order to expand registered apprenticeship programs in the Federal Government. Thanks to a registered apprenticeship sprint for cybersecurity workers, more than 7,000 individuals were hired into a paid apprenticeship role across the nation.

This press release originally appeared online.

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Laura Ascione

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