5 new ways colleges are reaching high school students

Each fall, the recruiting season seems to be the same process for colleges and universities: Send recruitment mailers to prospective students who signed up online or at college fairs to receive information and wait for them to arrive on campus for the standard tour and Q&A session, U.S. News reports. While discussions about rejuvenating the recruitment strategy presumably take place in admissions offices annually, the threat of declining applications due to a new campaign that flops may be serving as a roadblock to innovation. Still, there are some colleges and universities that are breathing new life into the recruiting process in order to supplement–or buck–the traditions. Here are five examples of schools using social media and technology to connect with prospective college students…

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At some colleges, professors live in dorms, too

Though university websites trumpet faculty embedded in dorms, some students are wary, U.S. News reports. In 1827, Francis Wayland, then-president of Brown University, suspended the university’s medical program when the physicians on faculty refused to live on campus. Nearly two centuries later, faculty-in-residence programs have proliferated, and an online search yields dozens, if not hundreds, of university websites detailing programs that embed faculty in dorms…

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Best college professors

The teaching you receive in college is undoubtedly one of the more important part of the experience. Who you have as a professor can make you enjoy a subject you didn’t before, or even change your career path. US News and World Report recently named the best colleges for undergraduate teaching. Ivy Leagues Darthmouth and Princeton tied for the top spot with Ohio’s Miami University rounding out third place…

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10 colleges that lead to graduate school

For some college students, pursuing an advanced degree after graduation is inevitable. (Premed students, for instance, know they’ll need to go to medical school to become doctors.) Others may immediately pursue a graduate education, at a law school, perhaps, to follow a lifelong passion, says U.S. News. Still other students may look to graduate school as a safe haven from a stagnant job market. Whatever the reason, many students enroll in graduate school shortly after completing their college degree…

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Colleges step up to meet dyslexia challenge

Even high-achieving students may find it difficult to be admitted to competitive colleges, but for those with dyslexia, the hurdles can be higher. A growing number of colleges, though, are showing a greater appreciation for these students, U.S. News reports. Some 45 college admissions deans from across the country gathered at Stanford University this past June to learn about high-achieving dyslexic applicants. Experts shared the latest research, and well-known figures–including California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, financier Charles Schwab, and Delos “Toby” Cosgrove, a heart surgeon and CEO of the Cleveland Clinic–described their experiences coping with the disability…

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10 national universities producing the most interns

President Obama’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness announced commitments from 45 industry leaders–including American Express, AT&T, Boeing, Dell, Facebook, General Electric, Intel, JPMorgan Chase, Mastercard, Sprint Nextel, Sunoco, and Xerox–to double available engineering internships in August, U.S. News reports. The more than 6,000 new internships, according to the council, will be part of an effort to address a shortage of engineers in the country by providing “opportunities for hands-on, technical job experience.” With an extremely competitive job market facing them when they graduate, engineering majors–as well as students in a variety of other areas of study–choose to supplement their coursework with internships, which give them an opportunity to get out of the classroom and into real-life work situations…

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U.S. higher education glossary available

What’s the difference between a college and a university? Who are undergraduate students versus graduate students? What’s the FAFSA? Studying in the United States can be confusing if you don’t fully understand the words used in U.S. higher education, U.S. News reports. With that in mind, U.S. News has compiled a glossary of important terms specifically for international students and parents. While this list is not exhaustive, it offers a key starting point as you explore the best U.S. universities for you…

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Students with average grades can get scholarships

While scholarship opportunities abound for students with eye-popping SAT scores and single-digit class ranks, those without remarkable academic backgrounds are often left to wonder if there are any scholarships left for them, reports U.S. News. Rest assured that there is financial support provided to those with average grades. More and more scholarships are becoming available for students based on creativity, community service, overcoming adversity and extracurricular activities. Regardless of your grades, test scores, or passions, there’s bound to be an opportunity for scholarship money for you, too…

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10 colleges that lead to graduate school

For some students, college is a stepping stone to a higher level of education, says US News. And the value of a graduate degree continues to increase as the percentage growth of Americans with bachelor’s degrees outpaces that of the nation’s population. For high schoolers interested in one day pursuing a graduate degree, it’s important to take note of the schools that are well versed in preparing students for the next level. At some schools, the majority of their recent graduates go on to graduate school, according to data provided by colleges to U.S. News in a 2010 survey of undergraduate programs…

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10 universities with largest financial endowments

Harvard University has about $10 billion more in its endowment than any other college in the country, according to data reported by schools to U.S. News & World Report. In 2010, the prestigious university reported that its endowment in fiscal year 2009 was $26,035,389,000. The next-highest endowed school in the country, Yale University, reported its 2009 amount to be $16,103,497,000…

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