Samsung tablet takes aim at iPad—with a pen

The stylus could be useful for those who need to draw or sketch on a tablet.

The tablet-computer market is like guerrilla warfare. One huge army—Apple—dominates the land, while a ragtag group of insurgents keeps raiding and probing, hoping to find some opening it can exploit.

With Samsung’s new Galaxy Note 10.1, the rebels have scored a small victory. It’s a tablet that does something that the iPad doesn’t do, and it does it well. This victory won’t win the war, though.

Available now in the U.S., the $499 tablet comes with a pen, or more precisely, a stylus. It doesn’t leave marks on paper, but the tablet’s screen responds to it. I found it a pleasure to use: It’s precise and responsive, and it glides easily across the screen.…Read More

College students: Tablets will replace textbooks by 2017

The Apple iPad still dominates among tablet owners on campus.

Interest in computer tablets has been consistently high on college campuses since the Apple iPad hit the market in April 2010, but not until this year did tablet ownership spike in higher education.

Only 7 percent of college students surveyed in 2011 owned a computer tablet. In 2012, that number has spiked to 25 percent, and students now see their sleek new tablets as the inevitable replacement for their bulky, pricey textbooks.

Six in 10 college students – and seven in 10 high school seniors – believe tablets will replace traditional textbooks within five years, according to findings from the Pearson Foundation’s Second Annual Survey on Students and Tablets, which was made public March 14.…Read More

University’s tablet program under review after tech officials put on leave

Students and faculty were asked to present their tablets for proper tagging Nov. 18.

Three employees at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) have been placed on administrative leave while officials review possible errors in the implementation of a pilot program that provided tablet computers to students in an honors program.

The university said Nov. 18 that Homer Coffman, chief information officer; Mike Herndon, director of procurement and contract services, and Dr. Bob Lyman, who resigned his position as provost on Nov. 16 but remains a member of the faculty, each was placed on leave.

About 700 Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 devices were distributed as part of the U-Tab pilot program to selected students, faculty, and staff to help transform the educational experience by providing mobile access to courses and class content.…Read More

India announces $35 tablet computer for rural poor

India's low-cost Aakash tablet. (AP)

Following through on a promise made last year, India introduced an inexpensive tablet computer on Oct. 5, saying the device would deliver modern technology to the countryside to help lift villagers out of poverty.

The computer, called Aakash, or “sky” in Hindi, is the latest in a series of “world’s cheapest” innovations in India that include a 100,000-rupee ($2,040) compact Nano car, a 750-rupee ($15) water purifier, and $2,000 open-heart surgery.

Developer Datawind is selling the tablets to the government for about $45 each, and subsidies will reduce that cost to $35 for students and teachers. In comparison, the cheapest Apple iPad tablet costs $499, while the recently announced Kindle Fire will sell for $199.…Read More

Seton Hill scales the ed-tech integration summit

Colleges have followed Seton Hill's lead in iPad adoption.

Realizing that students today “interact with the world in radically different ways than previous generations,” Seton Hill University in Greensburg, Pa., was one of the first schools in the country to give its students iPads after Apple introduced its iconic tablet computer last year.

But it was Seton Hill’s vision for transforming education through the use of technology, and its focus on staff development to achieve this goal, that led to its selection as our “eCampus of the Month” for October.

Here, Vice President for Information Technology Phil Komarny describes the university’s ed-tech vision and its keys to success.…Read More

Campus survives the ‘iPad jitters’

Two-thirds of Seton Hill faculty members say they frequently use the iPad in class.

Putting Apple iPads in the hands of every student and professor on a PC-based campus required some convincing, but a year later, Seton Hill University officials said the tablet program has changed the way classes are taught.

Seton Hill in Greensburg, Pa., a small campus of about 2,400 students, drew international attention in 2009 when officials there said every student and educator would receive an iPad just after the tablet was announced.

Read more about the iPad in higher education……Read More

College student interest in tablets high, ownership low

OSU officials says the iPad can save students money.

Tablet computers aren’t exactly flooding campus lecture halls, as fewer than one in 10 college students own the mobile devices. Still, students are enthused about tablets’ educational potential.

Seven percent of college students said they owned a tablet, and 15 percent said they would buy one in the next six months, according to research published May 24 by the Pearson Foundation.

While tablet ownership on college campuses hasn’t skyrocketed since the release of the popular Apple iPad, most students said they would like to own one. Only two in 10 college students said they had no interest in buying a tablet.…Read More