As the skills gap grows and employers seek skilled workers, microcredentials offer a path to education and workforce growth

Where can microcredentials take higher education?


As the skills gap grows and employers seek skilled workers, microcredentials offer a path to education and workforce growth

Editor’s note: eCampus News is exploring the future and potential of microcredentials in a multi-story series. Check back each week for fresh perspectives from educators and industry experts.

The COVID-19 pandemic ushered forth dramatic declines in college and university enrollments, widespread unemployment, and it cast a spotlight on the skills gap and the increased demand for upskilling and reskilling in today’s workforce.

As more and more surveys reveal that employers are struggling to find workers who are highly-qualified and prepared for a global and always-evolving workforce, microcredentialing initiatives are becoming increasingly widespread.

Unlike academic degree programs, microcredentials are bite-sized educational courses with a more specific focus. They could take months or weeks to complete.
Because of their convenience, microcredentials appeal to employees looking for a highly personalized, flexible, and cost-effective way to further their education.

As automation and technological advances change the job market, policymakers and employers recognize the potential of microcredentialing and professional certifications to help meet demands for new skills.

Laura Ascione