COVID-19 has been a catalyst in an office culture shift that’s been gaining steam since the onset of the cloud. Since the coronavirus hit full force in the early months of 2020, remote-work models are fully in place for the foreseeable future. To remain competitive, companies now need to support these new paradigms by giving their employees the tools to make them happen.

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A new generation of young tech workers is entering the workforce right now, already armed with tech experience. They’ve grown up with the internet, social media, and coding as core parts of their culture. They recognize and value flexibility beyond the old confines of office attendance and 9-to-5 routines. Tech work and working from home afford them that possibility. Students poised to enter the workforce should strive to hone skills that will make them competitive and successful in remote environments.

Virtual coding education

Industry workers with some fluency in tech gain the most from e-learning. But those in blue-collar occupations or low-density, tech-absent population areas are being left behind. Manufacturing jobs are increasingly being sourced to artificial intelligence, with some projecting that 60 percent of all jobs will be handled by AI within 10 years.

Re-skilling is a way for companies to retain valuable employees through teaching them 21st-century tech skills like web development and/or software engineering. But government support for re-skilling, and remote learning in general, has been in short supply. This puts the onus of building effective e-learning prototypes on the industries. But those without regular jobs or with sporadic gigs must shoulder the responsibility themselves.

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About the Author:

Richard Wang is the CEO of Coding Dojo.


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