This summer, many faculty will work on developing or revising curricular content for their courses. One of the keys in developing new digital materials is verifying that those materials offer accessible content for all students.

Today, most learning management systems (LMS) and software programs offer some level of accessibility compliance checking. However, they are not always thorough or error-free.

Related: 4 myths about accessibility and online learning

Four areas to check to ensure your digital content is accessible for all students

For instance, some PowerPoint templates show less-than-ideal contrast between text and background colors. Many YouTube videos include closed captioning, but the automatic captioning often leaves something to be desired. Taking the time to review accessibility of materials makes sense to ensure all students can experience success instead of frustration.

About the Author:

Steven M. Baule, ED.D., PH.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Educational Leadership Department at the University of Wisconsin-Superior.


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