Planned wireless internet network threatens GPS

A new, ultra-fast wireless internet network is threatening to overpower GPS signals across the U.S. and interfere with everything from airplanes to police cars to consumer navigation devices, the Associated Press reports. The problem stems from a recent government decision to let a Virginia company called LightSquared build a nationwide broadband network using airwaves next to those used for GPS. Manufacturers of GPS equipment warn that strong signals from the planned network could jam existing navigation systems…

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eCampus News March 2011

eCampus News March 2011
View Online as a WebBook in your web browser

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/eschoolmedia/ecampus_201103/index.php#/58

15 Campus libraries are using technology to save time for users and staff, resulting in significant cost savings as well.
Departments
3 Front Lines
19 Stakeholder Relations
21 Money Matters
22 Product Spotlight
22 eCampus Partners
Highlights
Leading Edge
It’s man vs. machine in a game of Jeopardy! that could show how far artificial intelligence has come.
Teaching & Research
JFK library opens first online presidential archive; nursing students use iPods in their studies.
In
the News
1 $2 billion that could change eLearning
1 Obama: Spare education from budget cuts’
1 To ‘friend’ or not to ‘friend’: Dilemma for today’s profs’
6 For minorities, a new ‘digital divide’ seen’
8 Tech-savvy students prompt colleges to rethink rules’
9 Schools could profit, or lose, as web runs out of addresses’
10 How Google’s leadership change could affect education’
11 States look to Indiana as a model for online instruction’
11 Report predicts online learning explosion by 2015′
12 Comcast’s legal win raises questions for education’
12 Google makes ed-tech splash with apps marketplace’
13 Verizon challenges new net-neutrality rules in court’
13 Virtual classrooms take over LSAT preparation’
14 New site offers college essays, sans plagiarism’
14 Colleges accept video essays to connect with students’
1 8 Maine community college uses Skype to tutor students’

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When it comes to teaching, who needs experience?

As I think back over a dozen years in the classroom, I cannot recall the exact moment that I changed from an idealistic beginning teacher at the peak of my game to the space-wasting NEA member who is keeping some good young teacher on the unemployment line, says Randy Turner, English teacher, on the Huffington Post. When did experience turn from an asset to the biggest roadblock to saving American public schools? In Missouri, a bill has been proposed by Republican Rep. Scott Dieckhaus which would eliminate tenure and the due process it guarantees and allow administrators and school boards to fire teachers with or without reason…

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Targeted nature of email breach worries experts

Think twice next time you get an email from Chase or Citi asking you to log in to your credit card account. The bank may not have sent it, reports the Associated Press. A security breach that exposed the email addresses of potentially millions of customers of major U.S. banks, hotels and stores is more likely than traditional scams to ultimately trick people into revealing personal information. Security experts said Monday they were alarmed that the breach involved targeted information–tying individuals to businesses they patronize–and could make customers more likely to reveal passwords, Social Security numbers and other sensitive data…

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Will GOP scrutiny change the way professors use eMail?

UW released some of Cronon's eMail messages after a university review.

Professors and researchers might shy away from using their university-issued eMail accounts to discuss thorny political issues, turning instead to personal eMail, after a University of Wisconsin (UW) professor’s electronic exchanges were made public in accordance with a request from the state’s Republican Party.

UW history professor William Cronon came under scrutiny last month during Wisconsin lawmakers’ battle over legislation that would severely curb labor unions’ ability to collectively bargain. Cronon wrote a post for his blog, Scholar as Citizen, that questioned the origins of the union-busting bill.

Cronon also wrote a New York Times opinion piece critical of the Republican-backed legislation. Using Wisconsin’s Open Documents Law, conservative groups filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request seeking eMail messages from Cronon’s UW account that mentioned key words in the labor union political fight, including “recall,” “collective bargaining,” “union,” and “rally.”

UW Chancellor Biddy Martin said in an April 1 statement that the school had handed over an undisclosed number of Cronon’s eMail messages in accordance with state law.

Messages released by the university didn’t include “what we consider to be the private eMail exchanges among scholars that fall within the orbit of academic freedom and all that is entailed by it,” Martin said, adding that a university review of Cronon’s eMail messages revealed no “partisan political activity” using school resources.

Even if Cronon’s FOIA-ed eMail messages show no wrongdoing by the Rhodes Scholar, faculty members on campuses nationwide said the Wisconsin controversy could make professors think twice before sending eMail to a colleague that might be construed as political in nature.

A larger question is whether the GOP’s actions might have a chilling effect on academic freedom, if researchers shy away from tackling politically sensitive topics as a result of these probes.

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Opinion: Unpaid interns, complicit colleges

On college campuses, the annual race for summer internships, many of them unpaid, is well under way, says Ross Perlin for the New York Times. But instead of steering students toward the best opportunities and encouraging them to value their work, many institutions of higher learning are complicit in helping companies skirt a nebulous area of labor law. Colleges and universities have become cheerleaders and enablers of the unpaid internship boom, failing to inform young people of their rights or protect them from the miserly calculus of employers. In hundreds of interviews with interns over the past three years, I found dejected students resigned to working unpaid for summers, semesters and even entire academic years–and, increasingly, to paying for the privilege…

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More customers exposed as big data breach grows

The names and eMails of customers of Citigroup Inc and other large U.S. companies, as well as College Board students, were exposed in a massive and growing data breach after a computer hacker penetrated online marketer Epsilon, Reuters reports. In what could be one of the biggest such breaches in U.S. history, a diverse swath of companies that did business with Epsilon stepped forward over the weekend to warn customers some of their electronic information could have been exposed…

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Snooki earns $32,000 to speak at Rutgers University

Snooki, whose novel A Shore Thing was released in January, may not win a Nobel Prize for Literature, but she is earning more money than someone with that honor for speaking at Rutgers University, PEOPLE reports. The Jersey Shore star headlined an event Thursday called “Inside the Nicole ‘Snooki’ Polizzi Studio” at the school in Piscataway, N.J., where 1,000 students heard her talk about fist pumping, her signature hair pouf and the “GTL” lifestyle she lives out on reality TV, the university confirms to PEOPLE. She earned a whopping $32,000…

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Facebook cozies up to Obama and Congress

In early March, Barack and Michelle Obama appeared in an exclusive Facebook video from the White House. The topic was bullying prevention, and it was by far the highest profile in the series of online conversations the social-media behemoth has produced with various members of Congress and federal and state officials in recent months, TIME reports. “You can participate in the conversation online,” the President said, “right here on Facebook.” That endorsement is one of the most provocative examples of how Facebook is changing the way the social-media industry is throwing its weight around in Washington. This week, the company’s 10 Washington staffers moved into a gleaming 8,500-sq.-ft. (790 sq m) office near the White House, equipped with a studio for upcoming Facebook Live episodes with lawmakers. In recent months, the company has hired several experienced Washington hands, including Marne Levine, a former aide at President Obama’s National Economic Council. Facebook’s chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, is a former Clinton Administration official. And the company is reportedly courting Obama’s former spokesman, Robert Gibbs…

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Does your college have a gambling policy? Don’t bet on it, new site says

Fifteen percent of students say they've gambled on casino games.

Higher-education officials, students, and their parents might be able to better identify the signs of gambling addiction on campus thanks to a new website that provides reams of research and advice on how to help students with a bona fide gambling problem.

Launched March 29 by the National Center for Responsible Gambling (NCRG), CollegeGambling.org has facts sheets, research papers, and tips aimed at college health professionals, campus administrators, parents, and students hoping to identify and treat a gambling disorder before it ruins a student’s financial and academic life.

One of the website’s most prominent statistics is the percentage of U.S. colleges and universities that have any kind of gambling policy: 22 percent. Meanwhile, three in four college students said they have gambled during the past year.

College officials often propose ways to curb underage and excessive drinking, drug use, and unprotected sex on campus, but gambling is usually left out of these policy making discussions, said Christine Reilly, senior research director for NCRG.

“It is a mental health disorder and it should be given the same weight of other issues colleges worry about,” she said, adding that gambling wasn’t classified as a disorder until 1980. An absence of gambling policies in much of higher education, she said, “is a reflection of the public’s lack of understanding that this is a … disorder. There still hasn’t been a lot of attention paid to it.”

CollegeGambling.org has a quiz for students who want to know more about the symptoms of gambling disorders.

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