Higher-ed leaders can use specific strategies to assess their stakeholders’ agreement on what the institution’s goals should be and how it can achieve them

How Tools of Cooperation help higher-ed leaders move their institutions forward


Higher-ed leaders can use specific strategies to assess their stakeholders’ agreement on what the institution’s goals should be and how it can achieve them

One of the biggest challenges higher-ed leaders face is obtaining cooperation and agreement as they strive to move their institution forward.

Despite this major challenge, moving forward is a top priority–and an essential objective if instititions are to survive in a rapidly-changing higher education enviornment.

Institutions are grappling with pandemic-related challenges, shrinking enrollments as the number of high school graduates decline, and unrest related to politics and policy.

A new and innovative theory from the Clayton Christensen Institute aims to help higher-ed leaders better understand the inner workings of different levels of agreement inside their institutions and better equip them with the right tools to more their institutions forward.

There are a number of tools, ranging from motivational, visionary speeches to command-and-control orders, that higher-ed leaders can use to convince individuals to cooperate and work together. These are called the Tools of Cooperation.

Leadership tools are focused on results, as opposed to process, and are considered more effective because there is strong consensus about what individuals want from being part of the organization. Community members will follow visionary leaders with good standing and gravitas because they’re in agreement about what they want.

Laura Ascione

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