Survey results are promising and indicate that online learning was more successful than many in higher ed initially believed

Students give passing grades to pandemic learning


Survey results are promising and indicate that online learning was more successful than many in higher ed initially believed

The COVID-19 pandemic brought an influx of new challenges to higher education, with the move to online learning shedding light on equity gaps and student mental health needs. And while no transition was perfect, the majority of students, faculty, and administrators actually give pandemic learning a decent grade.

In fact, more students gave pandemic learning an “A” grade, while more faculty and administrators gave it a “B” grade, according to the fourth and final installment of the Digital Learning Pulse Survey, a four-part series intended to help better illustrate the needs of colleges during COVID-19.

The survey of 1,486 students and 1,286 faculty and administrators across 856 institutions was conducted by Bay View Analytics on behalf of the Online Learning Consortium (OLC), WCET (the WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies), University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA), Canadian Digital Learning Research Association (CDLRA) and primary partner and underwriter Cengage, a global education technology company.

“Student perspectives regarding their preferences and perceptions of quality are critical as we plan strategically for helping faculty leverage the professional development they’ve received in the past year,” said Angela Gunder, Chief Academic Officer of OLC. “Blended learning pedagogical practices are well poised to help bridge the gap between student access and success, and we’re re-imagining programming and resources that position faculty and staff to thrive in this space.”

Laura Ascione