eReaders like the Apple iPad gained traction in higher education this year.

Later this month, we’ll count down the 10 most significant higher-ed tech stories of 2010, as chosen by our editors. But first, here are the campus technology stories that you—our readers—deemed most noteworthy in the past year, as judged by the number of page views they received:

10. How to use higher education’s ‘new toy’: Social media

Campus technology officials in charge of social media efforts have come to a consensus: There are no social media experts, so keep experimenting with your school’s tweeting, linking, and posting until you’ve struck the right balance…

9. Florida college looks to become eBook pioneer

An all-eTextbook campus won’t just make Florida’s Daytona State College the envy of the education-technology world. The program will also save academic careers cut short when students can’t afford their books, pushing Daytona officials to find an electronic alternative and perhaps serve as a model for higher education…

8. Are today’s students addicted to social media?

University of Maryland students who went 24 hours without TV, cell phones, MP3 players, and laptops during a recent study reported symptoms you might expect from someone struggling with substance abuse, including an “unbearable” need for electronic communication, persistent anxiety, and a frantic “craving for some technology.” The study’s findings have prompted some observers to ask: Are today’s students addicted to technology—and if so, what implications might this have for education?

7. iPad pilots launching in higher ed this fall

Educators say there’s a simple reason they believe the Apple iPad pilot programs coming to colleges and universities this fall will run smoother than previous trials with popular eReaders: the apps…

6. Text messaging: a lecture hall epidemic?

College students say their professors would be “shocked” to know just how often they send text messages during lectures, and one researcher has offered a simple and stringent solution: Give failing grades to text-happy students…


Add your opinion to the discussion.