An upcoming version of Microsoft Corp.’s Internet Explorer browser will let users add lists of sites that they don’t want tracking them, a peace offering amid uproar over the sneaky ways that web sites watch their users as they bounce around the internet, the Associated Press reports. The new feature, however, won’t be as sweeping as a “do not track” option that the Federal Trade Commission is proposing to limit advertisers’ ability to do that. Users will have to create or find their own lists of sites they want to block. And the feature won’t be automatically turned on when it debuts with the release of Internet Explorer 9 early next year. Part of the reason for the uproar over tracking is that it’s hard to tell which sites you’re sharing information with. Websites use many third-party advertising partners, and some may use shady surveillance schemes, perhaps without the knowledge of the web sites…

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About the Author:

Meris Stansbury

Meris Stansbury is the Editorial Director for both eSchool News and eCampus News, and was formerly the Managing Editor of eCampus News. Before working at eSchool Media, Meris worked as an assistant editor for The World and I, an online curriculum publication. She graduated from Kenyon College in 2006 with a BA in English, and enjoys spending way too much time either reading or cooking.


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