More states are recognizing the importance of non-degree credentials

Although no state has comprehensive data about all types of non-degree credentials, including certificates, licenses, and industry certifications, states are improving their data-collection practices around non-degree credential attainment, according to Measuring Non-Degree Credential Attainment from the Workforce Data Quality Campaign.

States are most likely to have data about public for-credit certificate programs, registered apprenticeship certificates, and licenses.

Thirty-six states report having most or all individual-level data on for-credit certificates from public two-year institutions in their state. Twenty-seven states report having most or all data about registered apprenticeship certificates, and 22 states report having most or all licensing data.…Read More

We need to rethink how students learn

Employers are in desperate need of skilled workers to address current employee shortages and prepare for projected disruption in the workplace. Artificial intelligence, for example, will create 2.3 million jobs while eliminating 1.8 million by 2020, according to a 2017 Gartner report.

To fill jobs now while preparing for the future, countless organizations are rethinking how students learn and earn skills in postsecondary education. Such a change requires new mindsets for institutions and businesses.

The rise of micro-credentials
Perhaps the biggest trend that has the attention of colleges and universities is “microcredentialing,” as enrollment continues to decline in traditional college degree and master’s programs.…Read More

#9: How to do micro-credentialing and digital badging the right way

[Editor’s note: This story, originally published on April 5th of this year, was our #9 most popular story of the year. Happy holidays, and thank you for tuning into our 2018 countdown!]

Employers today are far less reliant on the four-year college degree than in the past, when the B.A. or B.S. served as a primary pre-hire indicator of future performance. Today, the bachelor’s degree is virtually a commodity. According to an analysis by Burning Glass Technologies, degrees are now to be found among the qualifications of workers in jobs that rarely demanded such a level of education. Clerks, service workers, and assistants are now almost “required” to be degreed.

Since virtually all candidates come with a degree, companies must find other ways to identify the best candidates—the ones with the skills to do the job. Some employers have even worked to identify specific institutions that reliably turn out graduates with grit, which is quite apart from factors like grades, majors, and transcripts.…Read More