Even before COVID-19 hit the U.S., higher education institutions were managing the implications for both study abroad programs and their home campuses.

When the coronavirus outbreak escalated in China earlier this year, Portland State University had three students studying abroad there. Two returned home, and one – a Chinese national – opted to remain in the country with his family. PSU indefinitely suspended all 18 study abroad programs in China that it offers students, many through program providers. On March 1, PSU leaders brought home four students from an exchange program in South Korea and six from a study abroad program in Italy. All adhered to a 14-day self-imposed quarantine.

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At Duke University, even though the majority of its study abroad programs occur in the fall, the university maintains a robust international presence. One of its flagship endeavors is Duke Kunshan University in China, which offers a Global Learning Semester program and a four-year bachelor’s degree program.

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About the Author:

Anthony Rotoli is CEO of Terra Dotta.


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