The Indiana University applicant knows the meaning of the big envelope versus the little one. A rejection letter needs only a page, but an IU welcome packet comes with a folder’s worth of pages to flip through and rejoice.

IU

IU has been a leader in social media.

Indiana University, however, has tried to find a way to make the gratification of the big envelope a bit more instant.

On the back of a wavy-patterned crimson envelope, the one that might be torn open in a fit of Hoosier hysteria, there is a message printed in large, white type.

“#IUsaidYes

Through a Twitter hashtag created for the IU Admissions handle, @IUAdmissions, newly accepted students are encouraged to quickly snap a picture of the envelope with their smartphones and post the picture to the social networking site.

IU will then “retweet” and share their celebratory post with the Hoosier Nation.

Sarah Shirley, a high school senior in Lawrence County, tweeted a picture of a piece of pumpkin pie she had sliced to celebrate — the university’s trademark, an overlapping I and U, drawn with whip cream.

Reilly Cosgrove, dressed as a zombie for Halloween, posted a “twitpic” holding up the “#IUsaidYes” envelope. Many of the accepted are even quicker to tweet the moment, because IU will actually send an email telling applicants their acceptance is in the mail, pumping the #IUsaidYes campaign.

#IUsaidYes started during this application cycle as just another way for IU to expand its influence in the social media realm. In this case, students are being indoctrinated before they step onto campus.

Social media sites such as Facebook were designed to bring the college experience to the internet.

For the past several years, IU has been one of the nation’s leading universities in the medium, using it to bring the university to the masses — students of past, present, and future.

See Page 2 for details on who is doing the tweeting at Indiana University (hint: it’s not the president).


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