For corporations, massive open online courses, or MOOCs, matter because they might become a major source of technical talent and training. No matter if 140,000 out of 150,000 students in an online programming class drop out — there are still 10,000 people being trained, a substantial potential resource in a world desperate for technical talent. More to the point, companies can run their own MOOCs, tailored to their own needs. That’s one goal for EdX, which released its code as open-source back in June and has also released its hosting scripts. Some vendor organizations have used EdX’s code to develop training classes. Earlier in November, the specialty steelmaker Tenaris said it would use EdX’s software for its Tenaris University, used to train the company’s global workforce. There are more such deals with companies on the way, Rob Rubin, VP of engineering at the education tech startup, said in an interview with InformationWeek.

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About the Author:

Jake New

Jake New studied journalism at Indiana University, where he was editor-in-chief of the campus newspaper, the Indiana Daily Student. At the IDS, Jake covered the IU administration, minority student issues, and state education policy. After a brief stint at the Bloomington Herald-Times covering IU, crime, and local politics, Jake interned at the Chronicle of Higher Education in Washington D.C, writing about online learning, open-access policies, academic publishing, and ed-tech startups. Jake joined eCampus News as an assistant editor in May 2013, where he continues to cover technology and higher education. His days often begin with a cup of coffee and the sinking feeling that another MOOC story is just around the corner. Follow Jake via Twitter: @eSN_Jake


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