“Flipped” and adaptive learning programs gained traction on campus. A high-profile internet hoax involving a college athlete propelled the term “catfishing” into the public consciousness. MOOCs hit some key stumbling blocks, while the notion of a college degree became more fluid.

Udacity's CEO Sebastian Thrun announces a partnership between the MOOC platform and San Jose State University in January 2013. The project was eventually put on hiatus.

Udacity’s CEO Sebastian Thrun announces a partnership between the MOOC platform and San Jose State University in January 2013. The project was eventually put on hiatus.

These were some of the key ed-tech developments affecting colleges and universities in the past year—and we’ve got a full recap for you right here.

In this special all-digital publication, the editors of eCampus News highlight what we think are the 10 most significant higher-education technology stories of 2013.

To learn how these stories have made an impact on colleges and universities this year—and how they’ll continue to shape higher education in 2014 and beyond—read on.

1. MOOCs grapple with low completion rates, faculty skepticism, and mixed results.

MOOCs so dominated the national conversation this year that they deserve two spots on our list. And while there have been some successes, such as a MOOC offered by the University of London that garnered a 91-percent student satisfaction rating, the grades have been largely mixed so far, despite all the hype.

In February, a University of California-Irvine professor stopped teaching midway through a MOOC in microeconomics offered through the Coursera platform, saying he had disagreements on how to conduct the free class for thousands of students around the world.


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