Apple iPad: The evolution of home computing

I have seen the future of home computing, and it is the iPad. I’m convinced of it, PC World’s Kenneth van Wyk reports. Yes, iPadurday has come and gone. Many of us have Wi-Fi iPads in our grubby little mitts. Early reviews have been mostly stellar. The device–and more importantly, the software running it–is superb, but certainly not perfect. And now we’ve seen Steve Jobs outline the next release of the operating system, iPhone OS 4.0. That’s all well and good, but largely secondary to my point. I’ve discussed the app store model here a couple of times , and the security ramifications it carries. Well, let’s consider the iPad in that light, now that it has been released. When I got my iPad, I immediately installed several software packages on it. Most of it was for entertainment (e.g., Netflix, ABC Reader), but I also installed a couple of apps that could at least ostensibly be used for business (e.g., Pages, Keynote). Each installation was simple: I ran the App Store application, found the tools I wanted, and clicked the purchase icon. Within moments, each package installed…

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GW students, staff cannot use iPad with campus network

George Washington University students who purchase Apple’s iPad will not be able to use the device to connect to GWireless, the campus’s wireless network, reports the GW Hatchet. Although GW Information Technology has yet to receive an iPad to test, initial indications are that the iPad will not work on the university’s wireless network until at least a year from now, said Rachel Blevins, communications and marketing manager for IT. “We are working on an access solution, but it is still in the pilot phase and is not yet available for general use,” Blevins said. She explained that the iPad and other smart-phone and tablet systems “use sign-in security, which is currently not compatible with our systems…”

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Stanford researchers launch new web site to monitor app security

With the launch of Apple’s iPad, developers are scrambling to create new applications. But are they safe? That’s the question a new web site hopes to help answer, reports the Associated Press. Internet security experts at Stanford University launched a site April 2 that reviews how well certain web and mobile applications protect users’ privacy. Dozens of the more that 200 apps listed on WhatApp have already been reviewed by a team of lawyers, computer scientists, and privacy and security experts from Stanford and other institutions. Shoppers and developers can add their opinions and request reviews. Stanford Law fellow M. Ryan Calo says the site provides a way to monitor what’s being done with collected information, while driving the app market toward better practices…

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Apple iPad to arrive in stores on April 3

Apple announced on March 5 that the Wi-Fi versions of its long-awaited iPad will arrive April 3 in stores in the United States, reports the New York Times. The models that can tap into AT&T’s 3G wireless data network will be available in late April. Customers can pre-order the iPad on Apple’s web site beginning March 12. Apple’s tablet computer is expected to ship with 12 new applications designed specifically for the device, and it will run almost all of the more than 150,000 applications available for the iPhone and iPod Touch. Apple has been aiming the iPad squarely at e-book readers like Amazon.com’s Kindle. And in its March 5 news release, Apple said that an updated version of its iBooks app that will include Apple’s iBookstore will be available as a free download on April 3 in the United States, with additional countries to be added later…

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Educators intrigued by Apple’s iPad

The Apple iPad will start at $499.
The web-enabled Apple iPad starts at $499.

Apple’s new tablet computer, the iPad, could push other companies to bring more color-capable eReaders to the market in a move that could make digital books more commonplace on school campuses, educators said after the long-awaited release of the technology giant’s latest product.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the iPad Jan. 27, calling it a new third category of mobile device that is neither smart phone nor laptop, but something in between.

The iPad, which is Wi-Fi enabled, has 10 hours of battery life, features a 9.7-inch screen, weighs 1.5 lbs, and will use the iPhone operating system, meaning education companies that have made iPhone apps can make their technology available for iPad users.…Read More