Volumes have been written about technology's ability to connect people. But burying one's nose in a book has always been somewhat isolating, reports the Seattle Times—so what about a device that occupies the evolving intersection between? "Strangers constantly ask about it," Michael Hughes, a communications associate at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, said of his iPad, which he uses to read a mix of novels and non-fiction. "It's almost like having a new baby." An iPad owner for four months, Hughes said people were much more likely to approach him now than when he toted a...

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About the Author:

Laura Ascione

Laura Ascione is the Managing Editor, Content Services at eSchool Media. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland's prestigious Philip Merrill College of Journalism. When she isn't wrangling her two children, Laura enjoys running, photography, home improvement, and rooting for the Terps. Find Laura on Twitter: @eSN_Laura http://twitter.com/eSN_Laura