My heart is knocking loudly against my chest, and silence rings in my ears. It’s always the same.

Exams bring me a dry mouth, the shakes and vomit-inducing nerves. This one is no different. I swallow and have a sudden memory of my young self on the terrifying day of my English A-level, desperately trying to collect my thoughts in a stuffy, overheated sports hall while my coughing, fidgeting peers were scribbling away around me. Has anyone else started writing? I look around and – I’m sitting in bed, looking at my laptop. The only invigilator is my cat. I gaze regretfully at my lackluster notes, cross my fingers and press “enter”.

The success of online learning lies, supposedly, in its accessibility, The Independent reports. It can be done anywhere; hurriedly on the bus to work, leisurely in a café at lunchtime or at home when the kids have gone to bed. Whether you’re in the middle of your career, bringing up a young family, or just passing the time between jobs, digital courses, in theory, provide busy people with an opportunity to learn on their own terms.

This autumn, FutureLearn was launched by the Open University, an initiative that will see free online courses (MOOCS, which stands for massive open online courses) made available to thousands of people around the world.

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About the Author:

eCampus News staff and wire reports


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