Evidence is emerging that the damage wrought by the sour economy is more widespread than just a few careers led astray or postponed, the New York Times reports. Even for college graduates — the people who were most protected from the slings and arrows of recession — the outlook is rather bleak. Employment rates for new college graduates have fallen sharply in the last two years, as have starting salaries for those who can find work. What’s more, only half of the jobs landed by these new graduates even require a college degree, reviving debates about whether higher education is “worth it” after all. “I have friends with the same degree as me, from a worse school, but because of who they knew or when they happened to graduate, they’re in much better jobs,” said Kyle Bishop, 23, a 2009 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh who has spent the last two years waiting tables, delivering beer, working at a bookstore, and entering data. “It’s more about luck than anything else.”

Click here for the full story

About the Author:

eCampus News staff and wire reports


Add your opinion to the discussion.