The results of a survey suggesting that 35 percent of middle and high school students with cell phones have used them to cheat at school is indeed alarming, writes technology columnist Larry Magid for CNET, but “I’m just as appalled at how schools are cheating kids when it comes to technology.” Magid continues: “…In addition to admonishing kids about why it’s wrong to cheat, perhaps it’s also time to rethink what it means to evaluate students in the age of the internet and omnipresent mobile devices. This survey might also present an opportunity for educators to re-evaluate the type of tests they’re giving. I think there is a role for tests that measure a student’s ability to quickly acquire and interpret information through mobile devices, even if they know nothing about the subject prior to sitting down for the test. … As Peggy Sheehy, a library media specialist from Suffern, N.Y., put it: ‘We can’t teach 21st-century literacy and assess with 19th-century methodology. We have to look at what we really need students to be able to do when they leave us.’ …”

Click here for the full story

About the Author:

eSchool News


Add your opinion to the discussion.