Survey gives higher education insights that could affect future efforts to woo high school seniors

demographics-high-schoolMillennials who grew up as unwitting subjects of niche marketing and narrow-casting are taking the lessons they’ve learned since childhood to the college selection process.

A new national survey of college students presents some surprising results. For example, African-American males were less influenced by financial aid/scholarship awards than white females were. And Hispanic males were much more inclined to pick a school based on where a friend is going than Hispanic females were.

Students of color across the country reported that college fairs and emails from the admissions offices were key information sources. Simultaneously, those sources didn’t even rank for white students.

Surveyed students from the South, who will be sophomores this fall, cared more about “appealing college traditions” than did New England students, who were more focused on “international/global experiences.”

The findings are mined from an online research visualization tool loaded with data from Lipman Hearne’s newest study, “The Super Investigator Goes  to College,” which captures the responses of more than 2,300 students across the U.S. The results are available without cost, and any user can “order up” their own queries by selecting their own parameters (such as type of institution and college setting) to examine the exact insights they want about these students.

(Next page: More fascinating results)


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