I’ve been a systems engineer and database administrator for fifteen years now, and it’s fair to say that there have been more than a few large-scale shifts in information technology in that time, Venture Beat reports. Perhaps no technology trend has driven a greater amount of change in that period, though, than the rise of big data. Big data, when harnessed properly, is undoubtedly a good thing. It enables people and organizations alike to make more accurate, data-driven decisions based on past and expected behavior. While organizations have been analyzing large data sets for better business and operational insights for some time now, it wasn’t until forward-thinking companies like Facebook and Google began building custom databases that were specifically intended for larger data sets that the big data movement really took off. The big data ecosystem is comprised of a large pool of modern databases and software packages, all of which require specialized training or certification to be harnessed properly. With this in mind, it’s no surprise that the Harvard Business Review recently referred to the data scientist, whose primary responsibility is to analyze complex data sets with these tools, as the “sexiest job of the 21st century.” Moreover, all signs point to the continued growth of storage and big data analytics as the Moore’s Law of the next decade.

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About the Author:

Denny Carter

Dennis has covered higher education technology since April 2008, having interviewed some of the most recognized IT pros in U.S. colleges and universities. He is always updating eCampus News with the latest in pressing ed-tech issues, such as the growing i


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