The percentage of students who prefer online classes has skyrocketed since 2007.

College students enrolled in entirely-online courses might prefer more face-to-face learning, according to a survey that says higher education is in need of more “hybrid” courses.

Hybrid or “blended” classes, shown by the Education Department (ED) to be more successful than web-based education, include online curriculum mixed with occasional in-person lectures.

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Support for classes that involve at least some traditional classroom-based education is shared by prospective college students as well as current students.

Nineteen percent of students surveyed said they are enrolled in a hybrid class, while 33 percent said they would like to take one or more hybrid courses, according to a report on college student preferences published by Eduventures, a Boston-based higher-education consulting company.

Three in 10 prospective students would take “wholly online” classes, compared to 44 percent of current students, more than doubling the 21 percent of students who preferred online classes in 2007.

The study suggests that some students are “forced into wholly online delivery because there is not enough supply of hybrid courses.”


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