A behind-the-scenes portrait of Corinthian’s shady practices

corinthian-colleges-fundsAfter wrapping up a nine-month electrician training program at Everest College-San Bernardino in 2011, Kenneth Dewar hoped to get the career placement assistance he had been promised.

Then he spotted his own photo on a campus wall featuring “successfully placed” graduates. The school had counted his sporadic gigs as a freelance audio engineer, work he secured before ever enrolling.

“I was a mark in their book, and they didn’t want to change it,” said Dewar, 39, whose attempts to get placement assistance went nowhere.

As federal regulators move to shut down Everest’s parent company, Corinthian Colleges Inc., corporate documents and interviews with company insiders provide a behind-the-scenes portrait of how Corinthian persuaded hundreds of thousands of low-income students to fork over as much as $40,000 for vocational degrees.

Interviews with staffers and students, along with government lawsuits and company regulatory filings, reveal a systematic effort to manipulate data used to recruit students and retain eligibility for federal student aid — the lifeblood of company profits.

(Next page: The loan pipeline)


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