Google and IBM are offering help to universities to get students to cope with vast amounts of data, reports the New York Times. For the most part, university students have used rather modest computing systems to support their studies. They are learning to collect and manipulate information on personal computers or what are known as clusters, where computer servers are cabled together to form a larger computer. But even these machines fail to churn through enough data to really challenge and train a young mind meant to ponder the mega-scale problems of tomorrow. Two years ago, IBM and Google set out to change the mindset at universities by giving students broad access to some of the largest computers on the planet. The companies then outfitted the computers with software that internet companies use to tackle their toughest data analysis jobs. And, rather than building a big computer at each university, the companies created a system that let students and researchers tap into giant computers over the internet. This year, the National Science Foundation issued a vote of confidence for the project by splitting $5 million among 14 universities that want to teach their students how to grapple with big data questions…

Click here for the full story

About the Author:

eSchool News


Add your opinion to the discussion.