“If you dislike annoying techno-utopian hype, you’re going to love Jonathan Rees’s anti-MOOC rant that Slate recently published,” Matthew Yglesias writes on Slate’s Moneybox blog. “And I think it’s fair to say that Rees raises a number of very legitimate concerns that MOOCtimists are giving short-shrift to the benefits of in-person education. At the same time, as Jonathan Chait points out a lot of Reese’s piece also seems to consist of naked appeals to the class interests of college professors. There are some interesting dynamics around this because academia has long been a stronghold of left-wing political ideas, and many people have savored the irony that you’re more likely to hear the case for socialism from a professor or a graduate student than from an actual member of the working class. But there was a very recent interesting N+1 article making the case that the growing precarity of university labor means that it now does make sense to explicitly construct left-wing politics as the class politics of professors and intellectuals.”

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About the Author:

Jake New

Jake New studied journalism at Indiana University, where he was editor-in-chief of the campus newspaper, the Indiana Daily Student. At the IDS, Jake covered the IU administration, minority student issues, and state education policy. After a brief stint at the Bloomington Herald-Times covering IU, crime, and local politics, Jake interned at the Chronicle of Higher Education in Washington D.C, writing about online learning, open-access policies, academic publishing, and ed-tech startups. Jake joined eCampus News as an assistant editor in May 2013, where he continues to cover technology and higher education. His days often begin with a cup of coffee and the sinking feeling that another MOOC story is just around the corner. Follow Jake via Twitter: @eSN_Jake


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