These are challenging times for legal education. The legal job market is eroding in ways not likely to improve in the near term, if at all, says A. Benjamin Spencer, law professor at Washington & Lee University School of Law who chairs the Virginia State Bar Section on the Education of Lawyers, for the Washington Post. Fundamental change is afoot in the legal profession. Some tasks previously performed by lawyers—such as document review—are now performed by computers here or legal workers offshore, or simply by cheaper in-house staff or contract attorneys…These developments have also laid bare defects in legal education, putting pressure on law schools to innovate and improve if they hope to survive. During better economic times, law schools operated under the assumption that their graduates would receive practical skills training on the job, at the expense of their employers…

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