An annual survey of independent colleges, released Tuesday, finds that students may pay a little less to attend college this fall, even as colleges charge more, The Washington Post reports. Student aid spending will rise by 7 percent in the coming academic year, according to a survey by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. Published tuition and fees will rise 4.5 percent. Tuition inflation has slowed during the downturn: this is the second consecutive year of tuition increases in the 4-percent range. During the 10 years prior to the recession, sticker prices rose an average 6 percent a year. But the average student actually spends a bit less now than before the recession, because of unusually large bumps in student aid budgets. Institutional aid rose 9 percent in the 2009-10 academic year.

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About the Author:

Denny Carter

Dennis has covered higher education technology since April 2008, having interviewed some of the most recognized IT pros in U.S. colleges and universities. He is always updating eCampus News with the latest in pressing ed-tech issues, such as the growing i


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