Through thoughtful analysis of their security solutions, higher-ed IT managers may be able to optimize their security stack

Optimizing through a cybersecurity analysis


Through thoughtful analysis of their security solutions, higher-ed IT managers may be able to optimize their security stack

Right now, we’re all dealing with challenging times. Revenues for organizations across-the-board are decreasing, and security threats have only increased since the pandemic. Many colleges are also seeing enrollments drop by unprecedented percentages. And pundits continue to debate whether we’re heading for—or are already in the midst of—a recession. There are pressures now on all departments to demonstrate efficiency.

For these reasons, higher ed institutions may look to economize in more strategic ways than they have considered before. Through thoughtful analysis of their security solutions, IT managers at educational institutions may be able to optimize their security stack while also reducing overall spending in this area.

Cybersecurity is one of the most crucial areas in which colleges and universities can invest, especially when it comes to securing an organization’s email data. Ninety percent of breaches occur due to phishing attacks that target email addresses. Yet few decision makers realize that higher-tier security offerings from companies such as Proofpoint, Google, or even Microsoft don’t necessarily offer the best range of security capability for the value. These companies may want to consider a different strategy, like layering or swapping-in a more specialized security solution, which often comes at a lower price point to boot. These independent security vendors may offer an abundance of advanced features, especially specific to inbound and outbound email data protection.

SEG vs. AI-based Security

Many top-branded security products still rely on traditional “SEG” or security email gateway methods to deter threats. This means their security gateways filter and block incoming emails based on whether those messages came from already-known malicious addresses. This filtering process is known as blacklisting, and is the basis for many traditional (yet often high-priced) solutions.

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