The hybrid learning and hybrid workforce models will reveal more innovation and progression in higher education and beyond

How are you developing the new hybrid workforce?


The hybrid learning and hybrid workforce models will reveal more innovation and progression in higher education and beyond

COVID-19 forever altered the higher education landscape. It forced schools to turn traditionally on-campus roles into remote roles. It also changed how institutions think about hiring staff and faculty. With geographic location no longer the deciding factor in many cases, schools now have a wider and more diverse pool of talent to choose from.

One of the biggest challenges facing administrators this school year and beyond is how to develop their workforces with disruptive factors such as remote learning, satellite campuses, and acquisitions. How can these institutions ensure a competitive workforce has the competencies and skillsets to respond to radical challenges in the industry?

According to a recent study from McKinsey & Company, younger workers in particular (18-29 year olds) are most interested in a hybrid work set-up, working two to three days a week from home, and the rest in an office. Technology will play a key role in providing institutions with the tools, data, and insights they need to assess the effectiveness of programs, departments, staff, and faculty to make a hybrid environment work.

A New Hybrid Workforce

As colleges and universities begin opening their doors for the fall semester, many will support a hybrid model for students and staff. Embracing this move will require institutions to have a proper technology infrastructure in place in order to train and support faculty and staff as they adjust to this evolving way of working.

eSchool Media Contributors