Public perception of traditional college along, with the need for upskilling and reskilling, could drive increased demand for microcredentials

Microcredentials are poised for great growth in the global economy


Public perception of traditional college along, with the need for upskilling and reskilling, could drive increased demand for microcredentials

Editor’s note: eCampus News is exploring the future and potential of microcredentials in a multi-story series. Check back each week for fresh perspectives from educators and industry experts.

Microcredentials aren’t new, but their potential is growing–and, in some cases, they may grow to be a preferred form of postsecondary education and training.

Microcredentialing is among one of EDUCAUSE’s six key technologies and practices identified in its 2022 Horizon Report as having a significant impact on the future of postsecondary teaching and learning.

Panelists highlighted the connections between the goals and work of higher ed and the demands and needs of professional industries and the workforce. The demand for upskilling and reskilling, driven in part by the growth of data- and analytics-based jobs, is also supporting the potential of microcredentials‘ impact.

The public perception of a traditional college degree could be contributing to the growth of microcredentials. Views of the value of a traditional degree have been declining, and major corporations including Google have announced in recent years that will not require college degrees for employment. Criticisms of student loans and the massive amount of debt students incur before they even begin earning salaries also are influencing how people view microcredentialing programs.

Laura Ascione