New survey results suggest concerns around academic integrity still exist, but are significantly diminished compared to 2020.

Instructors are less concerned about online academic integrity after COVID


New survey results suggest concerns around online cheating still exist, but are significantly diminished compared to 2020

Concerns about academic integrity in online courses have eased significantly among college instructors since 2020, when the transition to remote instruction was still ramping up due to COVID-19, according to a new survey from Wiley.

Only 27 percent of college instructors who responded to the September 2021 survey said they felt students were significantly more likely to cheat in an online course than in an in-person course, down from 62 percent who said the same in 2020. The percentage of instructors who were neutral on this issue rose to 20 percent compared to 5 percent in 2020.

“Many college instructors worried about problems with academic integrity when courses shifted to online instruction early in the pandemic,” said Jason Jordan, Wiley Senior Vice President of Digital Education. “Our findings, however, suggest those concerns were greatly allayed as instructors gained more experience with remote coursework.”

While instructors still express some concern about academic integrity in online courses, the findings suggest that those fears were not realized in actual experience.

Laura Ascione