Instructors are turning to educational simulations to help students build critical workforce skills--is your institutions following suit?

4 ways your campus can benefit from educational simulations


Instructors are turning to educational simulations to help students build critical workforce skills--is your institutions following suit?

A growing number of colleges and universities are turning to educational simulations for mental health awareness, sexual misconduct training, and more.

By immersing participants in different scenarios, educational simulations help close gaps in teaching skills and assessing learning, provide critical training that isn’t always possible face-to-face, and help increase workforce readiness.

Educational simulations are particularly helpful when access to a given scenario isn’t easily taught–or able to be taught at all–in traditional education settings. For instance, a student can use an educational simulation to give emergency medical attention or to work with components typically too dangerous to be used in school labs.

Educational simulations also offer students, faculty, and caregivers the chance to gain valuable experience with mental health issues and situations involving trauma.

Here are four examples of how these simulations are being used on campuses today:

1. To make them aware of sexual assault and recognize warning signs. One in 8 college students has experienced nonconsensual sexual contact by physical force or inability to consent since enrolling at their school. Through Kognito’s Sexual Misconduct Prevention for Students simulation, students complete five modules that help students understand the importance of preventing sexual assault and recognize warning signs; identify strategies for intervening and how to respond effectively in situations where peers have been affected by sexual violence or misconduct; differentiate the roles of Title IX coordinator, confidential advocate, and counseling services, and know when and how to refer peers; and determine when consent has or has not been given, and practice how to ask for, give, and not give sexual consent. Students have role-play conversations with virtual humans in various scenarios so they can practice the skills they’ve learned. Virtual coaches also provide personalized feedback.

Laura Ascione