What will learning look like as students return to campuses this fall—and how can hybrid learning play a pivotal part in it?

Hybrid learning’s role in what a successful school year looks like


What will learning look like as students return to campuses this fall—and how can hybrid learning play a pivotal part in it?

Over the past 18 months, the vast majority of industries have been disrupted by the pandemic and higher education is no exception. Colleges and universities were pushed towards digital transformation as online and hybrid learning models proved necessary to stay in line with health and safety precautions.

Despite all of the work undertaken last year, students struggled to find the same level of engagement online as they did in the classroom. With 2020 behind us, college and university students are starting their 2021-2022 school year amidst continued changes brought on by the pandemic, so it begs the question: What does successful learning look like for the year ahead?

Success means ensuring students get the same, engaging, inspiring learning experience no matter where they’re tuning into class. Higher education institutions can make this happen by strategically investing in the right technology to improve learning outcomes for all. Here’s a few ways we can track success this school year.

Fostering an immersive learning experience with AV technology

AV technology – from projectors, displays, pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras and digital microphones – is the key to creating an immersive, engaging learning environment. With easy-to-use technology, higher education institutions can maximize learning and productivity as these technologies can help sharpen critical thinking skills, develop creative problem solving and build the ability to work cooperatively in teams through interactive and collaborative settings – no matter the location of the student or educator. The bright visuals projectors and displays offer, matched with the uninterrupted sound quality from digital microphones provides a seamless learning experience so students don’t have to squint at a white board or guess what their teacher is saying due to poor audio, especially when masks are being worn.

eSchool Media Contributors