3. Privacy: Safeguarding institutional constituents’ privacy rights and maintaining accountability for protecting all types of restricted data

Institutions can keep up with privacy regulations by “providing training on best uses and highlighting best practices, and providing staff with real-world scenarios–it’s a topic that won’t go away,” Morales said.

4. Student-centered organization: Understanding and advancing technology’s role in optimizing the student experience (from applicants to alumni)

5. Digital integrations: Ensuring system interoperability, scalability, and extensibility, as well as data integrity, security, standards, and governance, across multiple applications and platforms

6. Data-enabled institution: Taking a service-based approach to data and analytics to reskill, retool, and reshape a culture to be adept at data-enabled decision-making

“Too many times, [campus] units are possessive of their data,” Campbell said. “It’s not ‘mine;’ it’s the institution’s data. How do we go about having that discussion and changing from ‘mine’ to ‘our?'”

7. Sustainable funding: Developing funding models that can maintain quality and accommodate both new needs and the growing use of IT services in an era of increasing budget constraints

8. Data management and governance: Implementing effective institutional data-governance practices and organizational structures

“Think of data as a pyramid–at the base would be institutional data, and the first step is to understand the nature, meaning, and accuracy of the data and how, in a long-term sense, it will be curated and maintained and kept usable,” Hartman said. “If you don’t have accurate data, everything will be incrementally much more difficult.”

9. Integrative CIO: Repositioning or reinforcing the role of IT leadership as an integral strategic partner of institutional leadership in achieving institutional missions

10. Higher education affordability: Aligning IT’s priorities and resources with institutional priorities and resources to achieve a sustainable future

Changing the conversation is key to helping higher-ed leaders advance higher-ed affordability, Early said. “How do we take the amount of money the university spends on IT and help the university invest that and make the dollars go furthest?” CIOs have to figure out their roles when it comes to growing revenue, mitigating risk, and optimizing cost, she added.

About the Author:

Laura Ascione

Laura Ascione is the Managing Editor, Content Services at eSchool Media. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland's prestigious Philip Merrill College of Journalism. When she isn't wrangling her two children, Laura enjoys running, photography, home improvement, and rooting for the Terps. Find Laura on Twitter: @eSN_Laura http://twitter.com/eSN_Laura


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