Trump added that his administration will focus heavily in the coming months and years on encouraging women to pursue STEM studies and enter STEM fields in the workforce.

“We need policies that help support women in the workforce, and that’s really very much going to be addressed by my administration over the years, and to get more and more of these bills coming out, and address the barriers faced by female and those in STEM fields,” he said.

The move comes as many educators and stakeholders worry that policies enacted under the Trump Administration will have a negative impact on public education.

The challenge of attracting and retaining more women in STEM fields has gained more attention over the past several years, with federal funding dedicated to studies that examine the issue. More and more pilot programs and initiatives are emerging in an effort to reverse the alarming trend.

When it comes to STEM, many women report experiencing negative stereotypes in class, and many say they lack female role models. Two-thirds of women in a recent CDW-G survey said they struggled with confidence.

Of survey respondents who left STEM fields, 69 percent left their programs before junior year, 30 percent said they felt like they didn’t belong in their major, and 29 percent said the material was too challenging.

CDW-G’s UniversITy Women pilot program partners with Indiana University and the University of Wisconsin connects female executives from leading technology companies with college women to cover current trends and opportunities in the technology industry, and to provide the students with valuable exposure and resources.

About the Author:

Laura Ascione

Laura Ascione is the Managing Editor, Content Services at eSchool Media. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland's prestigious Philip Merrill College of Journalism. Find Laura on Twitter: @eSN_Laura http://twitter.com/eSN_Laura


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