6. Dynamic assessment: This focuses on the progress of the student, with the assessor interacting with students during the testing phase of the process and identifying ways to overcome each individual’s learning difficulties—assessment and intervention are inseparable.

7. Event-based learning: Running over a few hours or days, this type of learning creates “a memorable sense of occasion,” notes the report. Examples include ‘maker fairs’ of do-it-yourself STEM projects and crafts.

8. Learning through storytelling: According to the report, developing a narrative is part of a process of meaning-making in which the narrator structures a series of events from a particular point of view in order to create a meaningful whole—a structure that helps learners to embed and revisit their learning. An example includes writing up an experiment, reporting on an inquiry, analyzing a period of history, etc.

9. Threshold concepts: “Something that, when learned, opens up a new way of thinking about a problem or a subject of the world,” explains the report. One example includes the physics concept of heat transfer that can inform everyday activities such as cooking or home energy use.

10. Bricolage: A practical process of learning through tinkering with materials, and involves continual transformation. The report states that this is a basis for creative innovation, “allowing inventors to combine and adapt tools and theories to generate new insights, while also engaging with relevant communities to ensure that the innovation works in practice and in context.”

The report, “Innovating Pedagogy 2014,” is the third report in the OU’s Innovation Report Series. For the full report, click here.

For more information on the series, click here.


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