1. Massive Open Social Learning (MOSL): Aiming to explore the network effect, thousands of people interact online in productive discussions and the creation of shared projects to share experience and build on knowledge.

2. Learning design informed by analytics: Used in the development of courses or series of lessons to help educators plan a coherent sequence of media, tech and pedagogies, the use of learning design tools shifts attention away from content towards the learners’ needs. According to the report, data from tracking and management of learning activities can inform learning design by providing “evidence to support the choice of media and sequence of activities. When analysis of learning data is also used to evaluate and improve learning design, the circle is complete.”

3. Flipped classroom: Reverses the traditional classroom approach to teaching and learning by moving direct instruction into the learner’s own space through video lectures. This allows time in class to be spent on activities that exercise critical thinking and conversation.

4. BYOD: Bring-Your-Own-Device allows “teachers to become managers of technology-enabled networked learners, rather than providers of resources and knowledge,” says the report. This approach also has the potential to “reduce cost of IT provisions,” but schools must have the infrastructure and bandwidth necessary—still a challenge for many institutions.

5. Learning to learn: Central to this process is what the report says is “double-loop learning,” or working out how to solve a problem and reach a goal, but also reflect on that process as a whole, questioning assumptions and considering how to become more effective. “This helps them to become self-determined learners with the ability to seek out sources of knowledge and make use of online networks for advice and support,” explains the report.

(Next page: Innovations 6-10)


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