3. Intel. Big data opportunities emerge in organizations generating a median of 300 terabytes of data a week. The most common forms of data analyzed in this way are business transactions stored in relational databases, followed by documents, e-mail, sensor data, blogs, and social media.

4. Microsoft. “Big data is the term increasingly used to describe the process of applying serious computing power—the latest in machine learning and artificial intelligence—to seriously massive and often highly complex sets of information.”

5. The Method for an Integrated Knowledge Environment open-source project. The MIKE project argues that big data is not a function of the size of a data set but its complexity. Consequently, it is the high degree of permutations and interactions within a data set that defines big data.

6. The National Institute of Standards and Technology. NIST argues that big data is data which “exceed(s) the capacity or capability of current or conventional methods and systems.” In other words, the notion of “big” is relative to the current standard of computation.

How do you define Big Data? Share your thoughts with me at @eCN_Denny and @ecampusnews.


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