That’s partly the goal of the new partnership with Google, as well, but the bigger takeaway of the deal could be that virtually anyone can now create a course through a major MOOC platform.

While students from all over the world have been able to participate in MOOCs, the courses have been mostly limited to instructors and content from elite universities like Stanford and Princeton.

“But this will offer a truly open option,” said Cali Morrison, manager of communications at WICHE Cooperative for Education Technologies. “Things have already been open from the student perspective, but this gives more openness on the other side as to who can provide content.”

Of course, with that new openness comes a new problem. How do you maintain quality courses on a platform where everyone is allowed to create and teach one? Morrison said she thinks quality assurance on MOOC.org could function in a way similar to how users can rate buyers and sellers on eBay.

“So if the providers, whether that’s a professor at a big name institution or high school teacher in rural Montana, provide good information, the crowd will then support them,” Morrison said.

Agarwal, meanwhile, has compared MOOC.org to a much different website: Google’s video sharing site YouTube.

Follow Jake New on Twitter at @eCN_Jake.


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