Each mentor works with no more than 15 students during the three month course, so they can provide one-on-one instruction.

The company’s staff handles the administrative side of things, such as finding and matching students to their instructors (the “not-fun parts,” Silver said), which frees up the mentors to focus solely on the students.

As the platform grows in popularity, Silver said he expects the number of instructors to increase with the number of students.

“We have a backlog of people who want to be mentors,” he said. “It’s a fun task, explaining something you’re good at to someone who wants to know.”

The company started in 2012 and has raised $1 million in funding from RRE Ventures, Quotidian Ventures and Peter Thiel, the billionaire venture capitalist who famously created a fellowship to encourage young people to quit college and pursue their own entrepreneurial dreams.


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